Cookie Policy
JourneyCheck uses Cookies to provide some of the enhanced features available to users as well as to support some of the central functions of the website. We will not store any cookies other than ones strictly required by the website in order to function, unless you accept them here. Further information is available on our Cookies Policy Page.
Accept all cookies Decline

JourneyCheck FAQs | General Alert FAQs | Alert Registration FAQs | Alert Message FAQs

My train was disrupted but I did not receive any alert. Why?
When I set my alerts up do I need to know exactly what trains I want to use and change my details when the timetables change?
How do I change my alerts?
Can I set up alerts for journeys where I have to change trains?
What happens when I go on holiday?
Will I always receive an alert at the time I have requested?
When will I get updates?
What types of problems are included in the alerts?
What does ‘may be cancelled’, ‘may be delayed’ mean? Why can this not be more specific?
Why if there are general problems on a route, are individual trains listed? Why not just say there is a general problem?
Are all the known problems included in the alerts?

My train was disrupted but I did not receive any alert. Why?

There could be a number of reasons as the system is essentially providing predictions of what is likely to happen and this can never be exact. In particular if you join a train where it starts its journey or close to there, it may be very difficult to accurately predict a likely delay before its timetabled arrival time at your station or the earlier specified alert time.

Back to top

When I set my alerts up do I need to know exactly what trains I want to use and change my details when the timetables change?

No, you define the period of time you may join your train. All services that you could use in this time period are registered for you automatically. Minor changes to train timetables thus do not affect your alerts although major changes to the train timetable or your personal use of the train service may require you to amend your Alert Details.

Back to top

How do I change my alerts?

You can at any time log-in on the JourneyCheck Alerts login page (using your username and password) and amend your own personal details and/or the details of the alerts you require.

Back to top

Can I set up alerts for journeys where I have to change trains?

Each alert is for a single journey leg but you can register for separate alerts for the different legs of your journey (if provided by ScotRail ). If your onward journey uses the services of another Train operator you will need to register with them for that part of your journey (if they provide this service).

Back to top

What happens when I go on holiday?

In your Alerts Details you can advise the system that you wish the alerts to be suspended.

Back to top

Will I always receive an alert at the time I have requested?

An email alert is sent out indicating either that there are no problems reported or indicating the problems likely to affect your services.

Back to top

When will I get updates?

If you have registered for updates and the likely affect on a particular train has changed (for better or worse), you will receive an update of the problem as an email. If applicable to you, you may alternatively choose to receive SMS text updates (subject to the maximum SMS text updates shown on your Alert Details page). Where an alert was sent indicating a problem and this was completely resolved during this time, the alert will be in the form of ‘is now OK’.

Back to top

What types of problems are included in the alerts?

Alerts for specific services will indicate: late arrival at your station, cancellation of the service, changes to the train such that it is no longer going to your destination and likely delays en route. Additionally, general problems on the route which might affect your service are also included.

Back to top

What does ‘may be cancelled’, ‘may be delayed’ mean? Why can this not be more specific?

At times there are general problems on a route such as a lorry hitting a bridge, a security alert or a major signalling problem and the exact effect on specific trains cannot be predicted very far in advance of your journey. In these circumstances a warning alert of ‘may be cancelled’ or ‘may be delayed’ is used as appropriate dependent upon the anticipated effect on your services.

Back to top

Why if there are general problems on a route, are individual trains listed? Why not just say there is a general problem?

Trains may come along different routes or parts of the route before the station you join at and it is important, therefore, to identify which of your trains may be affected by the problem.

Back to top

Are all the known problems included in the alerts?

All problems identified as likely to affect your services are included in email alerts.

Back to top

Powered By    © 2021